the pennants are not silk satin but a poly/rayon blend!

Posted: September 11, 2018 by Mo Crow in Braille for the Soul, It's Crow Time
Tags: , , ,

Last week Jude Hill of Spirit Cloth who worked in  the textile industry for many years wrote to let me know the 65 year old wedding dress that all 45 pennants were cut from is not a silk satin.
“It’s synthetic based. Trust me. I’m an expert. ( I used to do this for a living) It might be Poly/Rayon blend. When you light a match to it it forms a hard plastic like bead, cellulose makes ash. It does not dye fully with indigo, maybe the rayon part is taking some of the color. I got a very faded blue. The stitching is difficult to me. I’m only saying because when I looked at it I thought it might be silk. But I could tell right off when I handled it. ”
the proof is in the pudding, here’s a photo of Bronwyn Berman’s pennant, she burned the letters and you can see the hard little beads that have formed on the edges
I love how everyone has discovered a different way of working with their pennants & talismans for the dream
Hoping this helps and just to let everyone know there’s still plenty of time until December when I will need all the pennants and talismans back to attach them to the armature.
there’s enough stars on the form for now so I have taken some time out to make a starry necklace
wrapping some of the 5mm cotton rope from String Harvest with the same electric blue leather that I used on the branch
namaste
PS I love Patricia’s pennant and look forward to seeing where it takes her!
PPS here’s a small piece of the old wedding dress to see how it goes with inktense pencils
it’s still wet, will post another photo here when it’s dry
the inktense pencil has dried, there was a rotted yellow stain that disintegrated once the ink had dried making a half heart shape so I made a little red felt heart stuffed with rose petals, lemon verbena, and lavender along with a parchment star, will keep exploring!
and some jasmine from one of our gardens yesterday
Terri Windling just put up a beautiful inspiring post over on Myth & Moor
tucked inside one of the photos is this relevant text;
“When the gift moves in a circle its motion is beyond the control of the personal ego, and so each bearer must be a part of the group and each donation is an act of faith”
Lewis Hyde “The Gift”
with deep gratitude to this magic circle!

Comments
  1. Patricia says:

    Hey Mo! Yes, I concur about the fabric content. After I nearly ruined the pennant from different experiments, I just started adding to it. Now I think it’s so unlike the original that perhaps it won’t work for your purposes? Of course, the state of affairs here is so unlike the “original” intent that perhaps there’s something to be said for this altered piece. Attaching a pic. About finished bunt wanted you to see it in case it won’t work for your needs! Take care!

  2. Martine says:

    Jude is absolutely right, it is not silk. I noticed when I wanted to iron after dyeing. I’m going to try to overstitch the damage……..

    • Mo Crow says:

      (((Martine))) I know so little about this dress, the cloth was imported from England but the bride did not like the colour and there is deep sadness in it’s history. My friend never got to see her Mom’s wedding dress as a little girl, she wasn’t even sure it was her dress until she found an old wedding photograph… putting love back into the discarded cloth is healing old hurts & her Mom’s spirit as well as our beautiful broken world.

  3. Jude says:

    Oh how clever, the burning. Making do!

  4. Marti says:

    In the hands of those who know and understand the origins of cloth, the pennants made from their hands will weather any issues raised by the polyester/rayon content. What matters most is how we each interpret these pieces of cloth by how we see a world where Love is the Answer… by how we rise to connect with this universal vision of Mo’s…by our singular understanding of how we view our place in this connective place we call Earth and by how a call was sent out to the world and people rose up to answer.

    I say this as one whose knowledge of cloth is limited, whose stitching skills are very basic so when I received this precious and fragile cloth pennant, I was too intimated to work directly on it but instead, chose to completely enclose the cloth in plain organic cotton, naturally dyed by the gifts of the land, through my foraging and experimentation. In working in this way, I was protecting this old cloth but have now come to realize, that in so doing, I was protecting our Earth. Each pennant has been a benediction a protection, a gift and these singular gifts, combine to answer the need to speak of a World where Love Is the Answer, not just a Dream…to bring forth participation to Reality. and as the pennant making continues, to foster this legacy of connection for we are all one as is our Earth.

  5. fiberels says:

    Hi Mo (sent you a mail) It must be tough stitching again through the leather …

    • Mo Crow says:

      (((Els))) ah yes, working with the blue suede again is a lot harder than stitching parchment! I did get a drop of blood on it earlier but Judy Martin mentioned in a post awhile back that spit lifts blood from cloth and it works on leather too!

  6. Nancy says:

    I am grateful to Jude for sharing her knowledge and to the others here for sharing their hearts. Like Marti says, I am not a fabric/stitch expert. I think that is why I am procrastinating so. I only hope I can get it together and mailed off in time. At least I have an idea, a starting point.

  7. So, now I know why black walnut and tea stains didn’t take. Great. Love the notion of BURNING letters. I’ll be going a different way as soon as I get going. Love to all.

  8. Liz A says:

    how things may turn out not to be what they seem, but we love them all the same … even more, perhaps

  9. Marti says:

    So glad that I came back to read comments because Patricia’s pennant photo was added and it is so wonderful in its colors, stitching, figure in the center. This pennant, how the colors morph from a deep night sky into a sense of coming into the light of day, ending with a rosy colored patch that speaks to how we go on, into a new day, filled with hope, possibilities, always going forward, no matter what has gone on before and isn’t that just the best depiction of hope and dreaming into action…for me, the figure in the center is a shape- shifter; guide, teacher, friend, goddess, she-warrior or simply a figure of whimsy, whatever we need it to be because in turning a world from despair into Love, we need all of these qualities.

  10. ravenandsparrow says:

    This discussion of the fiber content of the wedding dress is interesting to me because I was worried about it right from the start. I had Mo mail me a scrap to experiment on, even. My tests were inconclusive (unlike Jude, I’m no expert) but I decided to go ahead with my usual processes anyway. Covering all the bases I used both alum sulfate and alum acetate to mordant, and got the colors to bite within reason. I think the fabric must be mostly rayon. Anyway, watching how other people grapple with this technical problem expands the experience for me. We are all in it together.

    Patricia’s pennant is a wonderful addition to the group. I love the little figure in the dark sun circle, and the beautiful variation in the blues. I’m looking forward to its completion. Also, the inktense pencils look like a way to add color to the cloth. I hope someone goes down that road.

    • Mo Crow says:

      (((Dana))) you achieved such rich colours with your meticulous process, you are an amazing alchemist! the inktense pencils are drying nicely, the only place they haven’t taken is over an old yellowed stain so I will stitch a parchment star over it and make some little wings for the heart, I wasn’t going to make a pennant but this one is making itself!

  11. Fiona says:

    It’s so interesting to me how much we are all learning as we participate in this magic! I love what you did with the inktense pencils – lots of possibilities there – and the heart to fill the hole…perfect. Go well

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